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FREE EVENT! 75th Anniversary of the Social Security Act 1938

Championed by Michael Joseph Savage, the 1938 Social Security Act was based on the principle that every New Zealand citizen had a right to a reasonable standard of living.  Introducing a free health care system with a comprehensive array of welfare benefits for families, the elderly, invalids and the unemployed - the Act has been described as the greatest political achievement in our country's history.

Please join us on Monday 16th September at the Holy Trinity Cathedral, Parnell, Auckland.

Doors open: 7.00pm

Event begins: 7.30pm

Light refreshments: 8.40pm

For more information and to RSVP lease click here

Child Poverty Action Group and Holy Trinity Cathedral invite you to celebrate this historic occasion on Monday 16th September from 7pm.  Light refreshments will be served afterwards.

Championed by Michael Joseph Savage, the 1938 Social Security Act was based on the principle that every New Zealand citizen had a right to a reasonable standard of living.  Introducing a free health care system with a comprehensive array of welfare benefits for families, the elderly, invalids and the unemployed - the Act has been described as the greatest political achievement in our country's history.

Child Poverty Action Group is delighted Holy Trinity Cathedral will host the event with The Very Reverend, Dean Jo Kelly-Moore opening the evening.

Special guests Professor Paul Dalziel (Lincoln University), Senior Lecturer Mamari Stephens (Victoria University) and Associate Professor Susan St John (University of Auckland) will reflect on the historial significance of social security, review its current context and look ahead to its future in New Zealand.

The commemoration is expected to draw a wide audience given the Social Security Act left an indelible stamp on the political and cultural landscape of New Zealand. 

We welcome all to join us for the evening.

For more information and to RSVP lease click here

 

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